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Here you can find some ideas and guidance to write an abstract:

Read this wonderful article from University of Berkeley:  How to write an abstract

Samples:

Abstract Example #1

Purpose: The purpose of this project was to determine if supplementing pregnant and lactating women with DHA and extending the duration of exclusive breastfeeding through the first year of life will improve neurological development in infants.

Methods: Participants included women of child bearing age with singleton pregnancies who were given either a placebo or a DHA supplement of 300 mg per day. Study components included a maternal blood draw and breast milk samples to determine DHA levels, food records and infant development tests. A large component of the project comprised of a breastfeeding peer support program which consisted of prenatal visits, hospital visits, home visits and phone calls with anticipatory breastfeeding guidance for up to an infants’ first year of life to ascertain that woman in the study will breastfeed for longer durations to establish a link between DHA and neurological development.

Outcomes: Preliminary data showed that the breastfeeding support piece has been integral in maintaining women in the study and increasing breastfeeding duration. Final data analysis will occur in December 2012.

Abstract Example #2

Background: In 2008, Colorado passed the Workplace Accommodations for Nursing Mothers Act which requires employers to provide adequate break time and a private place for an employee to express breast milk for her nursing child. Unfortunately, this law does not protect university students.

Methods: An environmental scan was completed at the university to determine appropriate locations that would provide breastfeeding mothers with a comfortable and private space. Once the space was located, development of protocols and obtaining space items occurred. A breastfeeding space usage questionnaire was developed to determine the effectiveness of the space.

Results: Results of the environmental scan determined that the most appropriate space was located in the Women’s Resource Center (WRC). Discussions occurred with WRC staff to determine interest level. A breastfeeding space protocol was developed and items for the space were donated or purchased. Six months later, the Lactation Station was unveiled at a WRC open house where students, faculty, staff and lactation consultants were invited. In four months, five breastfeeding women have repeatedly used the space. All women (100%) have stated that the Lactation Station met their needs and they would not have breastfed their infants past six months without the space (mean duration rates were approximately 8 months).

Conclusions: The Lactation Station has been successfully instituted and evaluations will continue to ensure that the space meets the needs of students. Challenges and opportunities for future spaces were determined. In addition, two other departments on campus have been approached to have a Lactation Station instituted in their areas.

 

Abstract Example #3

Breastfeeding is the recommended form of infant nutrition throughout the first year of life. A common reason why women cease breastfeeding is because of returning to work or school. In 2008, Colorado passed the Workplace Accommodations for Nursing Mothers Act which requires employers to provide adequate break time and a private place for an employee to express breast milk for the nursing child. An environmental scan on campus was conducted to determine if there was a location that would provide breastfeeding parents a comfortable, private space. Three Lactation Stations (LS) were located and items were purchased for the spaces. LS protocol and policy development, and items obtained for the spaces occurred. Collaboration with Human Resources resulted in a lactation accommodation request form. A questionnaire on LS effectiveness and usage was developed and administered. Over 70 women (~1,300 visits) have used the LS since 2012. All parents who filled out the LS evaluation survey (n=35), have stated that the LS met their needs and without the space they would not have breastfed their infants past six months (average duration rates are approximately 10 months). The three LS have been successfully instituted and evaluations will continue to ensure that the space meets the needs of students, faculty, staff and the community. In addition, other initiatives such as developing a toolkit that universities can use to develop lactation support programs is currently being developed to continue to support breastfeeding parents on college campuses.

Contact Kobie for additional questions or assitance: kobiehousephotog@gmail.com

 

 

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